September 10, 2014

laughingloone:

Niko and Martha! So good! I wanted to reblog this from Niko but his tumblr is strangely unnavigable. Sorry, Niko

(Source: nicholas-francis)

September 8, 2014

lucyengelman:

For the past 2 years, my little sister Kirby, one third of Birch and Basil,has been a passionate beekeeper and advocate for the tiny pollinators. Her never ceasing enthusiasm to educate and act on behalf of the bees is incredibly inspiring. This past year, I’ve seen her passion grow from something she shared strictly with the bees to being an active advocate and educator as she spends her days teaching workshops, visiting elementary schools to give lectures, holding screenings for her award winning short film shot last year and others interested in helping the bees, to visiting surrounding keepers and their boxes.

She has come out of her shell in a way I can only think comes from the confidence she feels for the bees. I’m so proud of her and she is such an inspiration to me. And she’s just 18 y’all— never let anything get in the way of pursuing your passions. Live, breathe, explore, educate, and share that which you care for. You can change the world just being you. Kirb taught me that.

August 31, 2014
menandtheirdogs:

akaixab: by Geori Yordanov

menandtheirdogs:

akaixab: by Geori Yordanov

August 18, 2014
hands down my favorite part of this never ending road trip. You oughta see a show at red rocks.
Iron and wine played, well, Sam Bean really performed by himself with guitar and it was absolutely captivating.

hands down my favorite part of this never ending road trip. You oughta see a show at red rocks.

Iron and wine played, well, Sam Bean really performed by himself with guitar and it was absolutely captivating.

July 29, 2014
Oregon hot springs east of Eugene, one of the most beautiful places I’ve been hands down.

Oregon hot springs east of Eugene, one of the most beautiful places I’ve been hands down.

July 18, 2014
http://www.npr.org/2014/07/17/332051691/trans-bodies-trans-selves-a-modern-manual-by-and-for-trans-people?utm_campaign=storyshare&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social

Listen to the story on NPR’s link

http://www.npr.org/2014/07/17/332051691/trans-bodies-trans-selves-a-modern-manual-by-and-for-trans-people?utm_campaign=storyshare&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social

Listen to the story on NPR’s link

July 13, 2014
http://www.inspirationgreen.com/historical-cob-buildings.html

also Lloyd Kahn will be at the Santa Cruz Bookstore August 5th 7:30 PM

http://www.inspirationgreen.com/historical-cob-buildings.html

also Lloyd Kahn will be at the Santa Cruz Bookstore August 5th 7:30 PM

July 8, 2014
"Queerness, to me, is about far more than homosexual attraction. It’s about a willingness to see all other taboos broken down. Sure, many of us start on this path when we first feel “same sex” or “same gender” attraction (though what is sex? And what is gender? And does anyone really have the same sex or gender as anyone else?). But queerness doesn’t stop there.
This is a somewhat controversial stance, but to me queer means something completely different than “gay” or “lesbian” or “bisexual.” A queer person is usually someone who has come to a non-binary view of gender, who recognizes the validity of all trans identities, and who, given this understanding of infinite gender possibilities, finds it hard to define their sexuality any longer in a gender-based way. Queer people understand and support non-monogamy even if they do not engage in it themselves. They can grok being asexual or aromantic. (What does sex have to do with love, or love with sex, necessarily?) A queer can view promiscuous (protected) public bathhouse sex with strangers and complete abstinence as equally healthy.
Queers understand that people have different relationships to their bodies. We get what it means to be stone. We know what body dysphoria is about. We understand that not everyone likes to get touched the same way or to get touched at all. We realize that people with disabilities may have different sexual needs, and that people with survivor histories often have sexual triggers. We can negotiate safe and creative ways to be intimate with people with HIV/AIDs and other STIs.
Queers understand the range of power and sensation and the diversity of sexual dynamics. We are tops and bottoms, doms and subs, sadists and masochists and sadomasochists, versatiles and switches. We know what we like and don’t like in bed.
We embrace a wide range of relationship types. We can be partners, lovers, friends with benefits, platonic sweethearts, chosen family. We can have very different dynamics with different people, often all at once. We don’t expect one person to be able to fulfill all our diverse needs, fantasies and ideals indefinitely.
Because our views on relationships, sex, gender, love, bodies, and family are so unconventional, we are of necessity anti-assimilationist. Because under the kyriarchy we suffer, and watch the people we love suffering, we are political. Because we want to survive, we fight. We only want the freedom to be ourselves, love ourselves, love each other, and live together. Because we are routinely denied that, we are pissed.
Queer doesn’t mean “don’t label me,” it means “I am naming myself.” It means “ask me more questions if you’re curious” and in the same breath means “fuck off.”"

What Queerness Means To Me « Tranarchism (via docasaur)

what is said about gender is soooo much why i id as queer. but i love it all.

(via strugglingtobeheard)

Crunk Feminist Collective, hellz yes. 

(via kaleicious)

this is just utter perfection. ugh. so good. 

(via werewolfqueen)

I totally just quoted this on my FetLife profile.

(via beautifullydeviant)

this really is PERFECT.

(via noahsjourney)

(via noahsjourney)

July 8, 2014
"Queerness, to me, is about far more than homosexual attraction. It’s about a willingness to see all other taboos broken down. Sure, many of us start on this path when we first feel “same sex” or “same gender” attraction (though what is sex? And what is gender? And does anyone really have the same sex or gender as anyone else?). But queerness doesn’t stop there.
This is a somewhat controversial stance, but to me queer means something completely different than “gay” or “lesbian” or “bisexual.” A queer person is usually someone who has come to a non-binary view of gender, who recognizes the validity of all trans identities, and who, given this understanding of infinite gender possibilities, finds it hard to define their sexuality any longer in a gender-based way. Queer people understand and support non-monogamy even if they do not engage in it themselves. They can grok being asexual or aromantic. (What does sex have to do with love, or love with sex, necessarily?) A queer can view promiscuous (protected) public bathhouse sex with strangers and complete abstinence as equally healthy.
Queers understand that people have different relationships to their bodies. We get what it means to be stone. We know what body dysphoria is about. We understand that not everyone likes to get touched the same way or to get touched at all. We realize that people with disabilities may have different sexual needs, and that people with survivor histories often have sexual triggers. We can negotiate safe and creative ways to be intimate with people with HIV/AIDs and other STIs.
Queers understand the range of power and sensation and the diversity of sexual dynamics. We are tops and bottoms, doms and subs, sadists and masochists and sadomasochists, versatiles and switches. We know what we like and don’t like in bed.
We embrace a wide range of relationship types. We can be partners, lovers, friends with benefits, platonic sweethearts, chosen family. We can have very different dynamics with different people, often all at once. We don’t expect one person to be able to fulfill all our diverse needs, fantasies and ideals indefinitely.
Because our views on relationships, sex, gender, love, bodies, and family are so unconventional, we are of necessity anti-assimilationist. Because under the kyriarchy we suffer, and watch the people we love suffering, we are political. Because we want to survive, we fight. We only want the freedom to be ourselves, love ourselves, love each other, and live together. Because we are routinely denied that, we are pissed.
Queer doesn’t mean “don’t label me,” it means “I am naming myself.” It means “ask me more questions if you’re curious” and in the same breath means “fuck off.”"

What Queerness Means To Me « Tranarchism (via docasaur)

what is said about gender is soooo much why i id as queer. but i love it all.

(via strugglingtobeheard)

Crunk Feminist Collective, hellz yes. 

(via kaleicious)

this is just utter perfection. ugh. so good. 

(via werewolfqueen)

I totally just quoted this on my FetLife profile.

(via beautifullydeviant)

this really is PERFECT.

(via noahsjourney)

(via noahsjourney)

July 8, 2014
noflowershere:

A photo I took of beautiful Sophia from last summer’s Dyke March in Montreal, QC

noflowershere:

A photo I took of beautiful Sophia from last summer’s Dyke March in Montreal, QC

June 24, 2014
camp harmon working my bones 75+ hr weeks.
the first night at camp three of my campers came in at eleven o’clock because they all attended sarah’s graduation. just as the lights went out and the calmness of the night was settling in, the camper sleeping next to Sian’s bed ( my co) looked over at her and asked, ” Michael Jackson is dead right?”
I love my job

camp harmon working my bones 75+ hr weeks.

the first night at camp three of my campers came in at eleven o’clock because they all attended sarah’s graduation. just as the lights went out and the calmness of the night was settling in, the camper sleeping next to Sian’s bed ( my co) looked over at her and asked, ” Michael Jackson is dead right?”

I love my job

June 11, 2014

June 6, 2014

http://www.freundevonfreunden.com/interviews/mark-firth/

June 5, 2014
"

Not only TOMS, but also Starbucks and even Lockheed Martin and Wal-Mart have learned that linking their products to charitable causes makes for good business. We no longer buy only what we need, or even what broadcasts our identity. We buy what makes us feel like good people, and what makes us feel like members of a good, global community. The easy way to look at TOMS is to praise their charitable work. The harder, more troubling way to look at TOMS is to acknowledge it as an example of how corporations have assumed work most often associated with self-identified religious organizations: building community, engaging in charity, and cultivating morals.

TOMS is not alone in its willingness to link progressive social action with consumer spending. In fact, it exemplifies a broader corporate embrace of “conscious capitalism.” Coined by Whole Foods CEO John Mackey, this business model assumes that “the best way to maximize profits over the long-term” is to orient business toward a “higher purpose.” So Starbucks sells coffee to “Put America Back to Work,” the (RED) campaign raises money to fight AIDS, and—in the best example yet—Sir Richard’s Condom Company sends a condom to Haiti for each one it sells (“doing good never felt better”). Meanwhile, Bank of America logos decorate PRIDE banners and Lockheed Martin brags that it is a “champion of diversity.”

The globalization of neoliberal capitalism, and particularly the popularity of “conscious capitalism” as a practice and a discourse, signals a change in the landscape of U.S. religion and politics. “Neoliberalism” most often refers to a loosely cohering set of economic, social, and political policies that (1) seek to secure human flourishing through the imposition of free markets and (2) locate “freedom” in individual autonomy, expressed through consumer choice. But it is also a mode of belonging, where ritual acts of consumption initiate individuals into a global community of consumer agents. Within neoliberal logics of religious and political action, consumer transactions and corporate expansion are recast as forms of spiritual purification and missionary practice. And within conscious capitalism, the “higher purpose” is a world in which all people have a chance (or obligation) to participate in free markets—understood as a multicultural community of consumers.

For Mycoskie—whose title is “Chief Shoe Giver”—building this multicultural community is a theological mandate. He frames his Christian faith as a component of his personal relationship to the company. At the evangelical Global Leadership Conference, keynote speaker Mycoskie answered a question about whether TOMS represents any “biblical principles”: “TOMS represents a lot of different biblical principles. But the one I go back to again and again is the one in Proverbs. Give your first fruits and your vats will be full. … Because we did that and stayed true to our one-to-one model [even amidst financial strain], we’ve been incredibly blessed. We really did give our first fruits.”

In non-confessional settings, TOMS proffers a humanistic version of this prosperity gospel, recast for a neoliberal age. Losing the Bible quotes, the company emphasizes that the “fruits of faith”—in this case, economic success—abound for those who embody the ideals of authenticity, good intentions, and service. Or, “higher purpose” is profitable. TOMS is successful because it creates opportunities for people to live into their own “purpose” through a simple transaction: buying a pair of shoes.

"

TOMS Shoes and the Spiritual Politics of Neoliberalism  (via lunagemme)

(Source: rs620, via susannathinks)

June 1, 2014

Marin farm stand

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