October 21, 2014

http://ecocityproject.com/famagusta/

October 21, 2014
climateadaptation:

One of my favorite books on climate change denial.

climateadaptation:

One of my favorite books on climate change denial.

October 17, 2014
nomoremrnicespice:

11nextelchirp:

thugkitchen:

Look at what the fuck we got in the mail this morning. Less than a month away until the dopest cookbook ever drops.
Preorder your copy now or get left behind this fall.  

Don’t buy this book! This blog is run by corny white people pretending to be black by awkwardly inserting “motherfuckin” and “shit” in their recipes. 


Read Thug Kitchen: A Recipe in Blackface for a breakdown of their shenanigans, including the racist commercial they released to promote this racist book under their racist brand.
If you want an actual “thug” perspective on food that’s not a total mockery and actually stands for something, consider The Hood Health Handbook, written by actual black people who actually give a fuck instead of exploiting black culture for $$$.

nomoremrnicespice:

11nextelchirp:

thugkitchen:

Look at what the fuck we got in the mail this morning. Less than a month away until the dopest cookbook ever drops.

Preorder your copy now or get left behind this fall.  

Don’t buy this book! This blog is run by corny white people pretending to be black by awkwardly inserting “motherfuckin” and “shit” in their recipes. 

image

Read Thug Kitchen: A Recipe in Blackface for a breakdown of their shenanigans, including the racist commercial they released to promote this racist book under their racist brand.

If you want an actual “thug” perspective on food that’s not a total mockery and actually stands for something, consider The Hood Health Handbook, written by actual black people who actually give a fuck instead of exploiting black culture for $$$.

(via elizabeth-antoinette)

October 15, 2014

White Fetish - DarkMatter

10:41am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZXQWkv1TDAWzn
  
Filed under: darkmatter 
October 15, 2014
medievalpoc:

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Unknown artist, possibly of the Brazilian School
Black Artist Completing a Portrait of a White Female Aristocrat
Brazil (early 1700s)
Oil on canvas
Philadelphia private collection
[x], [x]
I was thrilled at first to see this image - a pre-modern Black woman artist, portrayed at work! But then I saw this:
Although this black artist appears to be wearing a dress, it is likely to be a male figure. As the scholar Sheldon Cheek explains, the artist wears an earring and a silver collar, both common articles worn by black male servants/slaves in Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries, the collar traditionally indicating slave status. Women rarely, if ever, wore the silver collar. The artist also appears to be wearing a silver “shackle” on the arm.
Ugh. Pretty awful.

I think we should all be pretty critical of what’s written about this painting. Especially the part you’ve quoted above about how they have assigned the gender of the artist in the painting. I find it bizarre that something that is supposed to indicate enslaved status (not gender) somehow trumps this person wearing women’s clothing (that’s also a woman’s hat to the best of my knowledge).
The Americas, including Brazil, have a long tradition of transgender and third gender people. This is one of those images from the past that falls quite easily through the cracks because it is a collection of “exceptions”; it doesn’t fit nicely into categories that have been created and therefore, it’s more or less ignored.
If anyone’s hesitant to be critical, maybe you should also note that both the articles linked above make claims that slavery in Brazil was “less harsh” than other places. What???
How many of our assumptions are being projected onto this painting? Are the “contradictions” present in it a product of the painting itself, or is the problem with the categories we try to place it in? How many layers do we have to fight uphill through when we even look at this image? After all, History teaches us:
women weren’t artists
Black people weren’t artists
Black people were enslaved
Enslaved people didn’t do anything of worth
Transgender, genderqueer and third gender people didn’t exist before the 1960s
white people control how Black images are perceived, but not the other way around
gender must be immediately perceivable and fit into our categories of “male” and “female”
^ So this is the baggage we bring with us when we look at this image. We look at this painting, and we actively search for indicators that allow us to continue to believe the above assumptions.
If we take away those assumptions, if we try to move past them and see this portrait with new eyes, what are we left with? Whose History do we see here? Maybe it’s mine; maybe it’s yours.

medievalpoc:

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Unknown artist, possibly of the Brazilian School

Black Artist Completing a Portrait of a White Female Aristocrat

Brazil (early 1700s)

Oil on canvas

Philadelphia private collection

[x], [x]

I was thrilled at first to see this image - a pre-modern Black woman artist, portrayed at work! But then I saw this:

Although this black artist appears to be wearing a dress, it is likely to be a male figure. As the scholar Sheldon Cheek explains, the artist wears an earring and a silver collar, both common articles worn by black male servants/slaves in Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries, the collar traditionally indicating slave status. Women rarely, if ever, wore the silver collar. The artist also appears to be wearing a silver “shackle” on the arm.

Ugh. Pretty awful.

I think we should all be pretty critical of what’s written about this painting. Especially the part you’ve quoted above about how they have assigned the gender of the artist in the painting. I find it bizarre that something that is supposed to indicate enslaved status (not gender) somehow trumps this person wearing women’s clothing (that’s also a woman’s hat to the best of my knowledge).

The Americas, including Brazil, have a long tradition of transgender and third gender people. This is one of those images from the past that falls quite easily through the cracks because it is a collection of “exceptions”; it doesn’t fit nicely into categories that have been created and therefore, it’s more or less ignored.

If anyone’s hesitant to be critical, maybe you should also note that both the articles linked above make claims that slavery in Brazil was “less harsh” than other places. What???

How many of our assumptions are being projected onto this painting? Are the “contradictions” present in it a product of the painting itself, or is the problem with the categories we try to place it in? How many layers do we have to fight uphill through when we even look at this image? After all, History teaches us:

  • women weren’t artists
  • Black people weren’t artists
  • Black people were enslaved
  • Enslaved people didn’t do anything of worth
  • Transgender, genderqueer and third gender people didn’t exist before the 1960s
  • white people control how Black images are perceived, but not the other way around
  • gender must be immediately perceivable and fit into our categories of “male” and “female”

^ So this is the baggage we bring with us when we look at this image. We look at this painting, and we actively search for indicators that allow us to continue to believe the above assumptions.

If we take away those assumptions, if we try to move past them and see this portrait with new eyes, what are we left with? Whose History do we see here? Maybe it’s mine; maybe it’s yours.

(via susannathinks)

October 15, 2014

jinxtergrid:

This is titled How To Apologize, but it also teaches you How To Recognize A False Apology When You Receive One.

(via susannathinks)

October 15, 2014

farmazing:

Okay, change of plans - shut down everything & pack it up for Common Ground this year.

October 15, 2014
The Great Maine Apple Day: Learn, Taste, Share, Enjoy!October 25, noon to 4 p.m.MOFGA’s Common Ground Education Center, Unity Celebrate the history, flavor and tradition of Maine apples while honoring the importance of a diversified, perennial agriculture. The annual Great Maine Apple Day, sponsored by MOFGA, Fedco and the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, takes place on Saturday, October 25, from noon to 4 p.m., rain or shine, at MOFGA’s Common Ground Education Center in Unity. Admission is $2 for MOFGA members and $4 for nonmembers.

The Great Maine Apple Day: Learn, Taste, Share, Enjoy!
October 25, noon to 4 p.m.
MOFGA’s Common Ground Education Center, Unity

Celebrate the history, flavor and tradition of Maine apples while honoring the importance of a diversified, perennial agriculture. The annual Great Maine Apple Day, sponsored by MOFGA, Fedco and the University of Maine Cooperative Extension, takes place on Saturday, October 25, from noon to 4 p.m., rain or shine, at MOFGA’s Common Ground Education Center in Unity. Admission is $2 for MOFGA members and $4 for nonmembers.

October 14, 2014

Green Reel 2014 fall film series

At 1:30 p.m. on Sunday, October 19, 2014, we open our season with Deconstructing Supper  at our new site, Boyden Public Library, off the town common in Foxboro. I have provided a description and some reviews. We hope you will watch the film with us. 

We will also be screening the following two films this fall:
October 26 - Heist
November 23 - Wisdom to Survive

October 13, 2014

http://vimeo.com/43912377

Wow this man. Please keep talking about bees you beautiful human with beautiful ideas. Noah Wilson-Rich on Colony Collapse Disorder.

October 13, 2014
Thursday, October 30 

Dr. Noah Wilson-Rich, founder and chief scientific officer, The Best Bees Company, and Dr. Randi Rotjan, associate scientist, New England Aquarium *Book signing to follow

The urban gardening movement is well aware of the importance of pollinators, native plants and water conservation, but the oceans are not a regular part of the conversation. The story is the same (but reversed) for ocean enthusiasts, who are well versed in issues of water conservation, pollution and overfishing, but the terrestrial environment is often ignored. Here’s a chance to finally talk about both the bees and the seas—how the “green” and “blue” movements have aligned goals and mutual interests. It may come as a surprise, but most of the actions needed to promote honeybee pollinators are the same actions necessary for healthy oceans. Come find out why, and your local honey will taste twice as sweet.

http://www.neaq.org/education_and_activities/programs_and_classes/aquarium_lecture_series/

October 10, 2014

beehivedesigncollective:

Announcing the Beehive’s Epic Illustration, Mesoamérica Resiste!

After 9 years in the making, it’s ready to be scattered far and wide!  PLEASE HELP US POLLINATE, by launching MESOAMERICA RESISTE into the world! WATCH THE LAUNCH VIDEO HERE ON KICKSTARTER!

Please LIKE, SHARE & FOLLOW upcoming posts!  Thanks SO much! <3  oh! …and check out our all new website! www.BeehiveCollective.org

October 10, 2014
antimidi:

Propuesta de afiche para la Feria del libro y el zine anarquista de Bogotá.
elaborado por Abisal Colectivo
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Abisal-Colectivo/220691034688392?fref=ts

antimidi:

Propuesta de afiche para la Feria del libro y el zine anarquista de Bogotá.

elaborado por Abisal Colectivo

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Abisal-Colectivo/220691034688392?fref=ts

October 10, 2014
antimidi:

Somo la plaga que no podrán controlar!https://www.facebook.com/midiabisal

antimidi:

Somo la plaga que no podrán controlar!
https://www.facebook.com/midiabisal

October 10, 2014

compassandwheel:

not quite done yet!

by the time this posts i will have spent 12 hours on press at the AS220 print shop printing up rewards for the Beehive’s Kickstarter! and then from Providence it’s on to NYC then Baltimore then Philly! away we go!

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